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Wick Voices

Wick Harbour Heritage Trail

Born: 1921

Duration: 22m 45s

Type: Video

Filesize: 109.6 Mb

Recorded: 12 September 2021

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About this recording





Wick Harbour Heritage Trail tells the story of some of the historic buildings, landmarks and sights of interest around the harbour area of Wick.

Pulteneytown sits on the south side of Wick River. The new town and the harbour were planned by engineer Thomas Telford around 1805, on behalf of the British Fisheries Society. The development was named after Telfords patron Lord William Pulteney, Governor of the British Fisheries Society.

Pulteneytown was a planned, industrial fishing port designed to accommodate the expanding herring fishing industry. Telford took care in his plans, to give people good housing and working conditions.

Throughout the 19th century, the fishing industry expanded, and Wick became the herring capital of Europe.

The planned village was built upon land obtained from Sir Benjamin Dunbar of Hempriggs and laid out in a grid system, accommodating houses and yards for the fishermen and their families in Lower Pulteneytown, close to the harbour. Many of the streets in this area were named after directors of the British Fisheries Society.

Points of interest along the route:

1. The Round House

2. The Fog Cannon

3. Wick Harbour

4. Wick Herring Mart

5. James Bremner Memorial

6. Wick Lifeboat Station

7. Stevenson Breakwater

8. Robert Louis Stevenson

9. Pulteney House

10. Pilot House

11. Black Saturday

12. Barometer

13. Cellar Gates

14. Harbour Quay




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